1. danedeasy:

Love it!

I just watched this again. So great! danedeasy

    danedeasy:

    Love it!

    I just watched this again. So great! danedeasy

    (Source: marvsbeest)

  2. Team Meeting Photo Shoot with MultiCare Consulting

    I’ve been working with the great people at MultiCare Consulting Services for over 4 years now. They have grown exponentially! When they have their ever-larger internal conference meetings, they have had me photograph their new hires, update the shots of individuals who’ve been with them for a long time, and do a big group shot of the team.

    This year the group has grown to over 60 people. We were fortunate to be able to use the incredible facilities of the Gleacher Center of the University of Chicago. We had some time constraints: we had to finish the entire shoot in 90 minutes so the team could all get to their next event.

    Thanks to the great organization of their Senior Executive Assistant Lisa Pyle as well as my fantastic team of Noah Gage and Brenna Ferguson we were able to easily take care of everything and let everyone get to their much more exciting bowling and dinner event!

    On a technical note: the time slot we had for the group meant that it was almost black as night outside but using a little trickery with multiple exposures, we were able to amplify the outdoor light to create a much brighter exterior background :)



  3. Location Portrait with Designer John Lutz of Selbert Perkins Design

    John Lutz was recently promoted to Partner at Selbert Perkins Design and I was honored that he hired me to do his portrait. John’s a super busy world-traveling designer but we were able to get several different looks in the time available. 




  4. Bright eyes

    Bright eyes

  5. railpass:

    San Antonio

    This is going to be a hard city to blog about, so I’m going to get the negatives out right away along with my favorite iphone pictures.

    Unfortunately, sometimes things go wrong. I’ve made a bunch of drafts for this post over the past three hours, but I don’t know. I didn’t expect much out of here, but I also didn’t want to miss going to major south-Texas city.

    My train pulled into the city at 1am two nights ago, and after a quick run around the downtown area I felt like I wasn’t missing anything. So, at 1am I biked thirty miles northwest to Government Canyon: a huge forest preserve that when I saw it on google earth I was like “aw hell yeah!”

    I’ll talk more about the canyon when I get the big pictures done, but beyond that spot I don’t think I photographed this city as well as I could have. To be honest, I stopped wanting to have a fancy camera out and visible. In the first three hours, I had two different people sick their dogs on me while pedaling by. Honestly, I wasn’t too phased by this, but once over by San Antonio’s fancy Pearl Brewery (probably the most gentrified area of the city) I was approached by a dude holding one of those big, industrial box cutters. He wanted my bike.

    Without the knife, I wouldn’t have been threatened by him, but the idea of fighting him off and getting one of more deep wounds from an inch-long razor blade was not something I wanted to deal with for the rest of my trip. I saw a guy in restaurant kitchen clothes, and called out to him to call 911. The box cutter guy immediately split, and I still had all my stuff.

    Okay so that was the bad. Could have been a lot worse, I guess. Everyone in the city I’ve talked to thought my bad luck was crazy and not common in the city. One person in particular went on to be extremely hospitable and offer to take me to her friend’s birthday party at a popular dive bar. The night definitely made up for the day, but in the process I missed my train to what would have been New Mexico.

    The train only runs a few times a week, so as to not overstay my welcome here, I’ve jumped on a megabus to Austin. We’ll see if I can get back on track once I’m up there.

  6. urbanautica:

EDWARD BURTYNKSY'Water'Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, New York19.09.2013 - 02.11.2013 
Two exhibitions of new work by renowned photographer Edward Burtynsky will be on view from September 19 – November 2, 2013, at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery and Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York. The exhibitions, both entitled Water, represent the artist’s largest and most remarkable project to date, tracing in intricate detail humanity’s complex relationship with the world’s most vital natural resource. 
The exhibitions coincide with the publication of a new book, Burtynsky – Water, to be published by Steidl in September 2013, and the release of a feature-length documentary film, Watermark. In addition, a touring museum exhibition, Burtynsky – Water, organized by the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA), will be comprised of more than 60 works at the Contemporary Art Center, New Orleans, from October 5, 2013 – January 19, 2014. 
The dramatic large-scale photographs from 2007 – 2013 document the scale and impact of  harnessing and consuming the world’s water supplies in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Europe, Iceland, Asia, and India. Burtynsky chronicles the various roles that water plays in modern life: as a source of healthy ecosystems and energy, as a key element in cultural and religious rituals, and as a rapidly depleting resource. 
"While trying to accommodate the growing needs of an expanding – and very thirsty – civilization, we are reshaping the Earth in colossal ways. Over five years, I have explored water in various aspects: distress, control, agriculture, aquaculture, waterfront, and source," states Burtynsky. "We have to learn to think more long-term about the consequences of what we are doing, while we are doing it. My hope is that these pictures will stimulate a process of thinking about something essential to our survival, something we often take for granted – until it’s gone." 

Burtynsky’s subjects include the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, pivot irrigation sites in Texas, and dryland farming in Spain. In these instances, the artist took to the air using helicopters and a small fixed-wing aircraft, to bring the scale of the human imprint into a more meaningful perspective. He also traveled to photograph millions of people bathing in the sacred Ganges River in India, mega-dam construction on the upper Yangtze and the once-per-year silt release on the Yellow River in China, the precious virgin watersheds of British Columbia, and the dry beds of the Colorado River Delta. 
© Bryce Wolkowitz

I have to see this exhibit!

    urbanautica:

    EDWARD BURTYNKSY
    'Water'

    Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, New York
    19.09.2013 - 02.11.2013 

    Two exhibitions of new work by renowned photographer Edward Burtynsky will be on view from September 19 – November 2, 2013, at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery and Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York. The exhibitions, both entitled Water, represent the artist’s largest and most remarkable project to date, tracing in intricate detail humanity’s complex relationship with the world’s most vital natural resource. 

    The exhibitions coincide with the publication of a new book, Burtynsky – Water, to be published by Steidl in September 2013, and the release of a feature-length documentary film, Watermark. In addition, a touring museum exhibition, Burtynsky – Water, organized by the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA), will be comprised of more than 60 works at the Contemporary Art Center, New Orleans, from October 5, 2013 – January 19, 2014. 

    The dramatic large-scale photographs from 2007 – 2013 document the scale and impact of  harnessing and consuming the world’s water supplies in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Europe, Iceland, Asia, and India. Burtynsky chronicles the various roles that water plays in modern life: as a source of healthy ecosystems and energy, as a key element in cultural and religious rituals, and as a rapidly depleting resource. 

    "While trying to accommodate the growing needs of an expanding – and very thirsty – civilization, we are reshaping the Earth in colossal ways. Over five years, I have explored water in various aspects: distress, control, agriculture, aquaculture, waterfront, and source," states Burtynsky. "We have to learn to think more long-term about the consequences of what we are doing, while we are doing it. My hope is that these pictures will stimulate a process of thinking about something essential to our survival, something we often take for granted – until it’s gone." 

    Burtynsky’s subjects include the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, pivot irrigation sites in Texas, and dryland farming in Spain. In these instances, the artist took to the air using helicopters and a small fixed-wing aircraft, to bring the scale of the human imprint into a more meaningful perspective. He also traveled to photograph millions of people bathing in the sacred Ganges River in India, mega-dam construction on the upper Yangtze and the once-per-year silt release on the Yellow River in China, the precious virgin watersheds of British Columbia, and the dry beds of the Colorado River Delta. 

    © Bryce Wolkowitz

    I have to see this exhibit!

  7. Baby and cat.

    Baby and cat.

  8. jasonmartini:

enjoy the game. it’s a dual.

Fantastic!

    jasonmartini:

    enjoy the game. it’s a dual.

    Fantastic!

  9. la-beaute—de-pandore:

Ursula Sokolowska

    la-beaute—de-pandore:

    Ursula Sokolowska

  10. carolriadmahnablog:

    This is a short film that was directed by the French animation collective H5, François Alaux, Hervé de Crécy + Ludovic Houplain entitles Logorama. Absolutely fantastic.